Failure Being Essential Component Of Success | ED | The Youth Blog Failure Being Essential Component Of Success
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    Why It Is Ok To Fail In Order To Succeed

    By

    September 6, 2015

    At a time when life is moving at supersonic speed and competition multiplying by the second, it has become difficult to stop for a minute and clear out the jumbled thoughts and ideas. It has become difficult to experiment and switch directions mid-way – it has become almost impossible to take the path less travelled. With every single road having already been explored by people before us, we have often lost sight of what we really want, and stood at crossroads, looking everywhere and wondering which course leads to our pot of gold.

    People say the younger generation has changed, that society has become more open-minded and indulgent towards variety and experimentation, but we are frequently made to question this notion. Yes, opportunities have, undoubtedly, increased ten- or even twenty-fold but that has in no way controlled the desire to follow a particular path and try to tower over the others, in any way possible.

    Businesswoman sleeping next to stack of books

    In fact, there are times when we stick to mainstream practices, simply because we fear failure – today’s generation is impatient, and there is no space for reconsiderations and hesitations.

    Clearly, while success is something everyone desires, it must be seen how the dominant definition of ‘failure’ is by no means exhaustive. Unlike popular opinion, the term has sevneral interpretations and means something entirely different to the other person.

    You may wish to be a car mechanic, and end up achieving just that – this will be a success for you, but for a segment of the society that frowns down upon this class of people, such an ‘achievement’ would of no consequence.

    you-won_t-become-successful-unless-you-encounter-failure-life-quote

    And what is it with society anyway, as it sits in judgement of every individual who’s a part of it? Who are we to relegate a group of people to the background, flick their personal interests and ambitions away, and weigh their ‘worth’ according to universal opinions?

    Haven’t we promised to acknowledge and support diversity and individuality? Why does this practice disintegrate the moment it’s introduced into the real world?

    And even if you do fail – on your own terms, and not that of the society – even then, it’s not something we should lose our minds over.

    Every hiccup ought to be used as a stepping stone.

    In fact, without a bit of failure in life, we might end up getting all cocky about our abilities – so I suppose it’s time for us to embrace failure, and not see it as a social taboo.

    Never a Failure-2C Always a Lesson

     

    Picture Credits: Google Images

    Views presented in the article are those of the author and not of ED.

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