Shocking Mystery Of The Bermuda Triangle: Is It Gobbling Ships & Airplanes? - ED | The Youth Blog | ED | The Youth Blog Shocking Mystery Of The Bermuda Triangle: Is It Gobbling Ships & Airplanes? - ED | The Youth Blog
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    Shocking Mystery Of The Bermuda Triangle: Is It Gobbling Ships & Airplanes?

    By

    March 27, 2016

    Unfortunately, all the sea monsters, alien abductors, UFO and time travel tales have been kicked to the curb and the much paranormal glamour attached to the ‘Devil’s Aisle’ has been ripped off; thanks to the Norwegian scientists for the spoiler!

    In a recent breakthrough, scientists in Norway laid down the scientific explanation behind the triangular mass that sits amidst the Atlantic and has been gobbling up ships and air crafts for 100 years.

    WHAT AND WHERE IS THE BERMUDA TRIANGLE?

    The Devil’s Triangle is a triangular shaped 500,000 miles area in the North Atlantic Ocean. It stretches from Bermuda Island to Miami, USA and Puerto Rico. Strangely enough, there is nothing official about the Bermuda Triangle. It is not even recognised as a place by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names.

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    Bermuda Triangle has been a vortex of mystery for hundreds of years inviting frenzied speculations ranging from the lost city to Atlantis to space-time aberrations. This intriguing piece of water has been gulping entities never to be found again.

    WHY HAVE SHIPS AND PLANES BEEN MEETING THEIR DOOM HERE?

    Let’s dive into some oh-so-logical explanations listed by scientists that Bermuda has been evading for long.

    1. Bermuda Triangle is one of those rare places on earth where the compass does not point towards Magnetic North. Instead, it points towards true north, which is enough to throw any navigator off course.

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    2. The Gulf Stream, a warm ocean current flowing from the Gulf of Mexico around the Florida straits north-eastward toward Europe, is extremely swift and violent to wash away any debris. The ferocious ocean current is known to move faster than 5 mph in some areas – more than fast enough to detour even experienced sailors hundreds of miles off course.

    3. Me to blame- Methane: Scientists with the Arctic University of Norway have discovered giant craters on the seabed of Barents Sea off the coast of natural gas-rich Norway. These craters, measured up to 800m wide and 45m deep, are probably owing to the presence of large concentrations of methane gas trapped in the ocean floor. This gas is due to dying and decomposing sea organisms.

    The gas surges up and erupts on the surface in a moment of rupture making the hot water less dense in the vicinity. It is big enough to swallow ships and vessels while the sediment quickly shrouds them. Even planes flying overhead could catch fire during such a blowout.

    Details of the discovery will be released at the annual meeting of the European Geosciences Union next month, where experts will analyse whether these kinds of bubbles could place ships in danger.

    4. Rouge weather patterns marked by storms, hurricanes, tornadoes are a common affair at this face of the Earth. Waterspouts that could easily destroy a plane or ship in the area are also not uncommon. A waterspout is another hazard that frequents the Bermuda.

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    5. When virtually drained to the seabed, this area can be seen to have an unfavourable topography that goes from a gently sloping continental shelf to an extremely steep drop-off. In fact, Bermuda harbours of the deepest trenches in the world. Enough to swallow hundreds of ships and planes, isn’t it?

    However, it is also important to note that many boats and aircraft do travel through the Bermuda triangle safely. Also, with the state-of-the-art scientific contributions, there is not much to unravel about this age-old mystery.

    Watch here for the secrets of this Triangle of Death revealed:

    Image Sources: Google

    Views presented in the article are those of the author and not of ED.

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