The Sudanese Government Rages A Chemical War Against Its Own Citizens - ED | The Youth Blog | ED | The Youth Blog The Sudanese Government Rages A Chemical War Against Its Own Citizens - ED | The Youth Blog
  • Check out our new reading mode

    The Sudanese Government Rages A Chemical War Against Its Own Citizens


    Use of chemical weapons is a war crime, and sadly the Sudanese government has been raging a chemical war against its own citizens ever since January 2016 and has destroyed almost 171 villages.

    The use of chemical weapons is not new to Sudan, who has been rebelling against its government ever since 2004. The situation had been brought to light when the news of a possible genocide circulated the media. The world and international organizations rushed to rescue, but nothing really changed. Soon, like any other news item, this too lost its ‘value’ and faded away.

    However, a recent report released by Amnesty International has shown that there have been almost 30 such attacks in Jebel Marra area of Darfur since January 2016. Surprisingly enough, the most recent attack was on 9 September 2016, and none knew about it.


    What Are The Accusations?

    In a war between the Sudanese forces in Jebel Marra and the Sudan Liberation Army/Abdul Wahid (SLA/AW), it is found that the Sudanese forces have been continually targeting civilians and civic property. The atrocious crime is worsened by the fact that out of the hundreds who have died, most of them are children.

    Now, death by chemical attacks is not an easy one shot death, but it is one that kills you from within and makes you want to kill yourself. Evidence collected by Amnesty International show that people those exposed to the chemical, at once experience bloody vomiting, diarrhoea, partial or complete loss of vision and even have problem breathing. More so, civilians have found to develop blisters and have also experienced a weird hardening of the skin. The smell of the bombs that had been dropped is still sensed and causes uneasiness.


    The attacks are traumatizing and do not stop with the chemical bombing, but are supplemented with a periodic killing of men, women and children, abduction and rape of women, looting and a large-scale displacement of civilians.

    What Does The Government Say?

    Has a government ever accepted its mistake? Never. Well, the Sudanese government is no exception. The Sudanese UN Ambassador Omer Dahab Fadl Mohamed has openly denied the allegations and has called them completely ‘baseless’ and ‘fabricated’. According to him, such allegations are only being done in order to create obstacles in the ongoing process of restoring ‘peace’ and economic stability in the country.


    It is possible that the Sudanese UN Ambassador has probably forgotten the fact that his country has been trying to restore ‘peace’ for almost 13 years now, and the situation has changed even a bit but has only worsened.

    What Has Be Done?

    The issue has been taken to the United Nations by Amnesty International, and immediate action has been requested. The report has helped in mobilizing attention towards Darfur, and the plight of the people there. Sadly, the death toll in Sudan will continue to rise, as the civilians lack access to medical facilities that could help reduce their agony. However, when these facilities will be made available to them, is unknown.

    For someone sitting miles away from Sudan, it seems nearly impossible to help the civilians there. The government has restricted entry of peacekeepers and humanitarians, well because their work of slowly eliminating their own citizens, is in progress.

    The situation in Sudan doesn’t seem to add up well. Why would a government go on a killing spree in their own country? And if they deny all the allegations made by Amnesty International, why hasn’t the chemical attacks stopped? 8 months of intense chemical exposure is no joke, and the world cannot go on to support another genocide.

    You May Also Like:

    Views presented in the article are those of the author and not of ED.

    Liked reading this article? Subscribe to us.
    In Economy